What challenges hydrogen production process?

As the race to a sustainable approach to new production is higher in demand so does the production process for such resources. Although hydrogen has been proved to be a competitive resource for reducing CO2 emission how far the production of such energy has been under control to generate for a longer time.

The artificial approach such as vitro where the fusion takes place in the test tube or on electrode surfaces other than the living cells has proved to be short-lived. The process of photosystem is created again and again in a complex process where the fusion of hydrogenase and photosystem takes place. As per the report published in erneuerbareenergien.de, the CAU research team concluded that “The metabolism of the living cyanobacteria repairs and multiplies the fusion of hydrogenase and photosystem and passes it on to new cells during division so that the process can in principle run permanently. With our in vivo approach, we have succeeded for the first time in realising solar hydrogen production in the living cell through a fusion of hydrogenase and photosystem.”

Even though the challenge of generating the hydrogen over a long time has been handled but the process gets deactivated in the presence of oxygen. The problem is tackled by minimizing the production or removing the oxygen where currently the cyanobacteria for hydrogen production is been converted partially to anoxygenic photosynthesis. The method is carried out by using electrons from water splitting or partly from other sources for hydrogen production.

The research further concludes on establishing photosynthetic water splitting for green hydrogen and other sustainable energy production so that the efficiency of solar hydrogen production can be further increased. The opinion concludes that how important the following methods need encouragement with better equipment and procedure so that the target of green hydrogen can be achieved shortly for a sustainable pathway.

Source:- https://www.erneuerbareenergien.de/wasserstoff-liefern-bakterien-die-energie-von-morgen

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